CARF Accreditation Awarded to Oceanside Community Services

Oceanside Community Services has been Awarded CARF Accreditation 2015 – 2018

We are excited to announce that CARF international announced that Oceanside Community Services has been accredited for a three year period for its Outpatient Treatment Programs in Integrated Adult and Children’s Services. This is the second 3 year accreditation that the international accrediting body has been awarded to Oceanside.

CARF is an independent, nonprofit accrediting body whose mission is to promote the quality, value, and optimal outcomes of services through a consultative accreditation process that centers on enhancing the lives of the persons served. Founded in 1966 as the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, and now known as CARF, the accrediting body establishes consumer-focused standards to help organizations measure and improve the quality of their programs and services.

The accreditation decision is awarded to organizations that, on balance, demonstrate that the persons served are benefiting from the services. An organization receiving a three-Year Accreditation has put itself through a rigorous peer review process and has demonstrated to a team of surveyors during an on-site visit that it is committed to significantly conforming to CARF’s accreditation conditions and standards. Service, personnel and documentation clearly indicate an established pattern of practice excellence​!

 Oceanside Community Services is a for profit organization with offices located at 209 Main Street Suite 302 & 303, Saco Maine.  It has been providing outpatient mental health services for individuals and families since March 2010.

 For additional information, please contact Oceanside’s Office at 207-571-9923 

Clinical Director Jonathan Negoescu, LCSW ext 302

Executive Director Julie Herrick, LCSW ext 301

OR visit our website at www.oceansidecommunityservices.com

 

OSC Quarterly News

Coming Soon

January 15th through January 16, 2015

A survey team from CARF International* will be visiting on

We invited the surveyors to evaluate how well we meet international standards for quality. The survey will tell us what we are doing well and ways we might improve. As a result of this survey, we may earn or continue accreditation.

As part of the survey, the surveyors will interview people who receive services, their families, our staff, and others. Some questions the survey team members might ask people are:

  • Do we provide a clean and safe setting?
  • Do you receive the services you need and want?
  • Are you treated with respect?
  • Do you take part in planning your services?
  • Are you told what you need to know about your services?
  • Are your questions answered in a way you understand?
  • Do you know where to go with questions or concerns?

If you would like to talk with one of the survey team members or want to learn more about CARF International, please let one of our staff members know. You may also contact CARF International directly.

  • Internet: www.carf.org/contact-us
  • E-mail: feedback@carf.org
  • Mail: CARF International, 6951 East Southpoint Road, Tucson, AZ 85756, USA
  • Telephone: (520) 495-7001
  • Fax: (520) 318-1129

 

September / October 2014

Oceanside Welcomes 

Helen Hoffses, LMSW-cc & Amanda Methot, LMSW-cc

Oceanside is pleased to announce two new clinicians have joined our team!  Helen Hoffses and Amanda Methot recently accepted the clinical positions.  Helen was an intern with our practice during her second year clinical rotation and has extensive experience working with issues related to parenting, trauma and abuse, ADHD, Autism, behavior issues, bullying, depression, anxiety and addictive behaviors.  After graduation, Helen obtained her license and accepted a position to continue to support the clients she began working with as an intern and also continues to build her case load.   Amanda also accepted a position with our team and has experience working with substance abuse and working in a partial hospitalization program facilitating and conceptualizing education, building skills and facilitating psychotherapy groups with adults needing support in managing mental health issues.    

 

Thank You From Julie & Jonathan

 Oceanside has benefited from adding remarkable people to our ever-growing clinical team.  Consistently, we are offered feedback from our community that many individuals enjoy working with our agency and benefit from community collaboration.  It is hard to believe that next week we begin another school year and shortly thereafter fall will be with us. As we enter the next Season, we hope to continue our work within the community and we greatly appreciate your ongoing support for our agency

Thank you!  

 

Healthy Mind/ Healthy Body

There is a powerful connection between an individual’s mind and body, also known as the mind/body connection. If you feel good physically, you increase your chances to feel good emotionally and vise versa. “We feel emotions in our bodies” wrote Anther Barsly, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of Worried Sick: Our Troubled Quest for Wellness. We have all experienced this concept; examples are when an individual is worried or nervous about starting a new school, job or meeting new people they may experience physical symptoms such as stomach ache, headaches, trouble breathing or an increase in heart rate just to name a few. On the other hand, individuals who have skipped a meal could emotionally feel confused, frustrated or agitated. There are also benefits to the mind/body connection, such as when an individual is emotionally feeling positive, they increase their chances feeling better physically and vise versa. In this quarterly news letter, we provided the physical and emotional benefits of sleep, eating healthy and exercise. We also provide five techniques to manage your anger; these techniques could also help with other negative emotions that individuals may experience. We also have provided a few activities to reduce stress.

Step 1: Recognize your triggers.

The first step to look at is why you lose your temper. Understanding our triggers as adults is just as important as trying to figure out what sets our kids off so that we can help them control themselves. As the mother of a proverbial middle child teenager who also has ADD,  and has a hard time controlling his impulses, I know that what triggers me is his bad attitude. When he starts with negativity or backtalk, it’s important for me to take a step back and really focus on how I’m feeling at the moment: my neck tenses, my cheeks feel flushed, and, having a hot temper myself, I can almost taste the words readying themselves to roll off my tongue in response! By recognizing my emotional triggers as well as the physical sensations in my body that are associated with them, I am better equipped to say, “Okay, I know that I’m not going down a good path. Stop.” Some triggers at your house might include your toddler saying “No!” for the one-hundredth time that day, your middle schooler rolling her eyes at you, or your high schooler failing to do their chores…again. When you are holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.

Step 2: Find your strategies to calm.
Finding a calming strategy that works for you can stop you from losing your temper.  Some ideas are:

  • Walk away (literally):When you find you are about to lose it, walk away from your child.  For older kids, feel free to say, “You know, I’m not ready to talk to you about this right now so I’m going to be alone for a few moments until I can calm down.”
  • Practice deep breathing:  Make sure you are breathing from your abdomen instead of shallow breathing from your chest. Practice doing ten full abdominal breaths until you are calm again.
  • Count backwards:Before opening your mouth to respond, consider counting backwards towards calmness, until you are in a different
  • Choose Your Battles.
    Too often our own tantrums are born out of parents feeling overwhelmed and frustrated, so it’s important to not put yourself in a position of feeling chronically overwhelmed by getting upset over every little annoying thing your child does. One way to combat this is to really think hard about what is important to try to enforce and what you can just let go of in regards to your child.

Be Kind to Yourself.
Lastly, practice self-care by being kind and forgiving towards yourself. Parents are harder on themselves than any other group of individuals I know of. This is born out of intense feelings of love and concern for our kids, as well as the desire to get it all right all the time. But there’s no such thing as a perfect parent who does it all right, all the time. Most of us are lucky if we can get through the day being a “good enough” parent. Whether you lose your temper once or twenty times, acknowledge to yourself that you’ve made mistakes, and commit to doing better in the future.

 

 

OCS News!!

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Yvonne DeCory, MD is increasing her hours with Oceanside starting March 17th and she is accepting NEW CLIENTS!!

Specifically Children and Adolescent in need of psychiatric medication management. Services can be for medication management only or can include counseling as well with one of our therapist.

Please call the office 207-571-9923 x 301 for more information or to make a referral.

We accept MaineCare and most commercial insurances

5 Techniques for Managing your Anger

Everyone becomes angry. When we become angry we feel out of control and helpless. These techniques are not meant to eliminate your anger, but rather to put you back in charge of the situation and teach you how to make your anger work for you. You can either try to control your anger or have your anger control you.

Technique #1: Change the color of your anger: Picture your anger as a color (red, purple). When you get angry, picture your anger as a different color (yellow, green) something that is calming to you. By doing this, you can picture feeling different and decrease your anger.

Technique # 2: Take a deep breath and count to ten: Taking a few deep breaths calms you, makes you feel stronger mentally and keeps things in perspective.

Technique #3: Remove yourself from the situation: You can’t control the situation but you can control how you react to the situation. Don’t discuss issues when you’re tires, or if the situation has already made you irritable. Choose a time to discuss the issue when you can talk rationally and comfortably- when you feel in control.

Technique # 4: Take care of you- you are worth it! Make time for you each day to reflect on issues and consider solutions to the problem, strive for balance in life, regular exercise, healthy eating and sleep.

Technique #5: Don’t look back, move forward: Focusing on what happened in the past doesn’t change what happened or encourage change in the future. When you put the lid on past problems, you free up time now to find solutions for current and future problems.

** Don’t react to anger, respond: an important technique to help you manage your anger is to change the way you think and to learn to respond to anger instead of reacting to it**

10 tips for improving a better night’s sleep.

Sleep is essential for a person’s health and wellbeing, according to the National Sleep Foundation (NSF). Here are 10 tips that can help you improve you night’s sleep and increase your personal well-being.

 

1. Avoid caffeine before bed

2. Relax before bed

3. Regular exercise

4. Keep your bedroom quit, dark and comfortable

5. Healthy eating

6. Avoid napping during the day

7. Avoid watching TV, eating or talking about emotional issues before bed

8. Take a hot shower

9. Read a book

10. Stick to a regular schedule

 

When people experience stressful situation or negative emotions there are strategies that can help the individual cope with the situation. Below are common coping skills that individuals uses in stressful situations:

– Take a deep breath and count to ten

– Exercise (dancing/kickboxing)

– Journaling/arts projects

– Meditation /yoga

– Listen to music

 

Healthy Mind / Healthy Body

There is a powerful connection between an individual’s mind and body, also known as the mind/body connection. If you feel good physically, you increase your chances to feel good emotionally and vise versa. “We feel emotions in our bodies” wrote Anther Barsly, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of Worried Sick: Our Troubled Quest for Wellness. We have all experienced this concept; examples are when an individual is worried or nervous about starting a new school, job or meeting new people they may experience physical symptoms such as stomach ache, headaches, trouble breathing or an increase in heart rate just to name a few. On the other hand, individuals who have skipped a meal could emotionally feel confused, frustrated or agitated. There are also benefits to the mind/body connection, such as when an individual is emotionally feeling positive, they increase their chances feeling better physically and vise versa. In this quarterly news letter, we provided the physical and emotional benefits of sleep, eating healthy and exercise. We also provide five techniques to manage your anger; these techniques could also help with other negative emotions that individuals may experience. We also have provided a few activities to reduce stress.

Enjoy Reading!!

From Oceanside Community Services

Oceanside Welcomes Jena Codrey

My name is Jena Codrey. I am currently a graduate student at the University of New England school of Social Work. I am honored to be able to share my last semester of my graduate work with Oceanside Community Services. I have a variety of experiences working with individuals in different stages throughout their lives. I have experiences working with children that have Autisms and their families, individuals that suffer with a metal health (MH) diagnosis and individuals and their families who are suffering with addictions, mainly drugs and alcohol. With the help from my colleagues here at Oceanside Community Service we bring you this quarterly news letter regarding the importance of having a healthy mind & healthy body along with tips that help manage anger and increasing a better night sleep.